Mixed Media-2D

Naomi Hart

© Naomi Hart

© Naomi Hart

Naomi Hart grew up in the Northern Wilds of Minnesota where the natural world became her education and her refuge. Hart uses symbolism from nature to tell the story of humanity in a manner that bears witness to the connective threads we all share. While dark and introspective, Hart’s work maintains a sense of hopeful wonder and joy. The viewer is quickly pulled in to find their own story within the many layers of each piece.  “My work is always an attempt to illustrate the elusive “now”, so ripe with potential; dark, mysterious, and fleeting. 

Naomi uses a multitude of drawing and painting materials to render on birch panels, laboring over exquisitely detailed renderings and fantastical creatures. Ultimately each panel finds it way to her encaustic studio for a final application of hot wax. “Encaustic (hot wax) painting lends itself to the manner in which I tell my stories visually. It is a versatile and engaging process which produces a sensual warmth that enriches my story and gives history and grounding to each piece” 

Hart is a storyteller and a self described time traveler who is passionately bridging the chasm between her story and yours. 

St Cloud MN

www.naomi4art.com

www.instagram.com/naomihart4art

2019 Booth #

I am an encaustic artist, a storyteller and a self proclaimed time traveller. Each piece utilizes a mixed variety of media beginning with detailed colored pencil or graphite drawings, oil or watercolor paintings, and intaglio prints on a birch panel. Layers of hand-cut stencils, chalk, graphite, gold leaf and found materials are finally finished with layers of a mix of hot beeswax and dammar resin with oil tint. Each piece is a tactile and engaging story with layers of information and details that keep the viewer engaged in discovery!

NaomiHartworking.jpg

Judith Edenstorm

Artifacts

Sioux Falls, SD
2019 Booth #

My art is created on a non-porous surface such as porclean tile or yupo, a plastic paper. The usual media used is alcohol inks, often supplemented with additional types of ink, pearl medium, or items that add a bit of glitz, like fake gold. The inks are often manipulated with brushes, canned air, or palette knives. The resulting surface is sprayed with a UV protectors to prevent fading. A final coat of a two-part resin is the top coat, along with hangers.

© Judith Edenstorm

© Judith Edenstorm

Becky Streeter

Eau Claire, WI
2018 booth #19

www.beckystreeterart.com

Fine Art by Becky Streeter is actually a family business: Becky and her father, Paul Nelson, work together to create amazingly imaginative three-dimensional works of art. Becky has been painting since she was a little girl, but it was her father's creative genius that really put them on the map. She taught him how to construct a basic canvas, and he ran away with the concept, using several different types of materials to build the canvas: expanding foam, pieces of wire, wine cork shavings, Amazon boxes and even a bathrobe. The finished paintings often have a whimsical slant and are generally painted with bright, eye-catching colors. Becky and Paul have heard all sorts of names for their art over the years including pop art, energy art, and “wow, that really freaks me out” kind-of-art. Each canvas becomes more intricate and delicate in both construction and painting, and they are always looking forward to their next great piece.

© Becky Streeter

© Becky Streeter

Clayton Bell

Florence, TX
2018 booth #47
www.goh2o.gallery
 

I attach elements of earth to self-built forms made of cement or wood to create The Original Rainmaker and my oversized stone mosaics. I use slate from India so when I create a stone mosaic I must consider the final weight of the piece. I veneer each stone after cutting it and use a razor blade to make each piece as thin as possible. I use hollow wooden doors for the canvas and most of my large stone mosaics are in the vicinity of 40 pounds. The Original Rainmaker was accidentally perfect. The triangular shape affords the best acoustics to project the sound . I chose the triangle only because it was the easiest structure to build, and later found that other shapes were not acoustically desirable. My name means "of the earth" and I recently moved my studio and home to the foothills of the Texas Hill Country............"under the earth".......6 feet under...

 

© Clayton Bell

© Clayton Bell

Westside Art Guild

Orono, MN 

www.westsideartguild.wix.com/mysite

2018 Booth #88 

Westside Art Guild mission statement: To facilitate idea exchange and to provide opportunities for artists to show and sell their work.  

Member work (left to right):  Shakun Maheshwari,  Lonnie Broden, Linda Muellar, Christine Bruce

Judy Hurd

Beadmused

Menomonie, WI

judithhurd.weebly.com

2019 booth #

Copper and stainless steel wire comprise my warp. These I combine with leather, silk, copper and silver component to comprise my weft. My woven structures are mounted on a leather framework & embellished with stone and copper beads. My material choices translate whether creating jewelry or woven structures.

 

© Judy Hurd

© Judy Hurd