2017 Featured Artist

Holly Foss

Minneapolis, MN
hollysuefossart.weebly.com
2019 Booth #

I enjoy the technical process of silkscreening. I begin with a drawing, clean it up and choose my colors. I then cut a green film to make stencils for each color. I adhered one stencil at a time into the screen. I hand print using a squeegee to push the ink through the screen onto my registered paper underneath. When I finish a color, I clean the stencil out of the screen and set up the next color. My work is signed and numbered limited editions.

© Holly Foss

© Holly Foss

© Holly Foss

© Holly Foss

© Holly Foss

© Holly Foss

 

 

Andrea Martin

St Paul, MN

www.andrearmartin.com

2017 booth # 100

Andrea Martin is an award winning local artist and papercutter. She received her BA in biology from Indiana University and studied art at the Maryland Institute College of Art. She has been cutting paper for about 7 years and started working as a full time artist after retiring from teaching science. Andrea exhibits her work at art fairs and exhibitions in the Twin Cities, as well as nationally and internationally. In addition, her work was featured on the Twin Cities Public Television series Minnesota Original.

Andrea uses cut paper to create nature scenes that explore the interactions of plants, animals, and humans in the urban landscape. Each design is cut from one piece of paper using an x-acto knife. Sometimes multiple layers of colored paper are used to enhance the design.

 

© Andrea Martin

© Andrea Martin

© Andrea Martin

© Andrea Martin

Mike Welton

Minneapolis, MN

www.mikeweltonart.com

2017 booth # 87

I started painting over 14 years ago. At that time I was photographing City scapes and was attracted to photographing buildings so it was a natural subject to paint. I paint 3 different series of oil paintings; Twin City Icons, Signage and Urban Extracts. The major Icon's Of the Twin Cities have been a pleasure to re-creating with Oil Paint. I try to capture the most intriguing angles along with heightening the light and color the subject already has. The immediate connection the viewer can make from my work is what makes the subjects of our beautiful neighborhoods so rewarding to paint. I'm continually honored by the memories and pride my work inspires from those who view it.

I have sold at art fairs nation wide for several years. I've sold my work in several galleries within the Midwest and east coast. Locally I'm with the Douglas Flanders Gallery Minneapolis. If I have sold the original Oil painting of my Iconic Twin Cities pieces; they are then sold as limited edition Giclee prints made from the digital scans of the original oil paintings.

I work in Oil paint on canvas. A few of my pieces have sharpie marker used in them too. First I under paint my work using acrylic ocher, that way light colors such as whites have to be painted a bit heavier and the painting over a dried ocher seems to brighten my colors. I Varnish my paintings with a high gloss to bring out the door even more in them.when they have dried long enough.

My process starts with my taking pictures of my subjects. I try to shoot photos that are close to the final layout of my picture as possible. I photocopy the image large enough to trace just the outlines of my composition. As I paint I carefully study the color of both screen and printed versions of my picture to paint. This helps me create pools of color I record for each area I paint. This way i create hues and shades of color uniquely my own off of observation of the real colors.

With the Urban Extracts series I visually translate my urban environment by extracting structural areas and recreating them though color, shadow and cropping. Density of buildings and their relationship to each other in connection with the atmospheric light are essential elements I use to translate reality into my paintings. I hope that by observing my work a new recognition for our urban landscape evolves and sparks a respect for new and old building structures.

© Mike Welton

© Mike Welton

Weltonpainting.jpg

Katharine Gotham

St Paul, MN

2019 Booth #

A few words about me-

After having been a ceramic artist for twenty years, I began studying painting five years ago. I've put in many, many hours in to develop my painting style and quality and am once again ready to exhibit work. My original oil paintings consist of still lifes, portraits and landscapes all done on rigid canvas panels. One of the most important aspects of my work is my devotion to working strictly from life. I get energy and inspiration from painting directly from my subject--whether it be a sugary cake warmed by my lighting, a dramatic sky over a bare field in spring, or a sleepy-eyed model. I also take care in framing my paintings to create a finished work of art that clients can immediately hang and enjoy in their homes.

A few words about my work-

The guiding principle in all my paintings and drawings is to work directly from life. Whether it's a bunch of radishes in the studio, or a rushing creek in the woods--having an unfiltered connection to my subject is my first priority.  I love the challenge of standing in front of any subject and expressing it with the simple and timeless materials of brushes and oil paints.

 

© Katharine Gotham

© Katharine Gotham

© Katharine Gotham

© Katharine Gotham

Sarah Chapman

Minneapolis, MN

www.chapmanmetals.com

2017 booth # 49

I strive to find a balance aesthetically between the industrial and natural worlds, with a focus on functionality. Each piece is hand fabricated, soldered, cast, cold-connected, or die-formed in oxidized sterling silver, copper, or gold. My jewelry is inspired by architectural and natural forms.

© Sarah Chapman

© Sarah Chapman

The objects I make are inspired by architecture, by nature as architect, and by my desire to build. I am struck by the process of building, how decisions are made, items are organized, and how a structure grows from nothing. I strive to find a balance aesthetically between the industrial and natural worlds, with a focus on functionality. My structures are fabricated, cast, cold-connected, soldered, etched, and die formed. I primarily work with oxidized sterling silver, copper, brass, and 14k gold to create my pieces.

Known for a unique design sensibility, balancing the sculptural forms of my jewelry with the softness of stones and surface textures. I've been a studio jeweler and educator for over twenty years, and value my passion for the metalsmithing field, demonstrated by my enthusiasm for continuing self-education and through educating others.

© Sarah Chapman

© Sarah Chapman

Originally from Chicago, I currently teach at Quench Jewelry Arts in the Northeast Minneapolis Arts District, and show my work throughout the U.S.

 

Andrew Shea

Andrew Shea Glass Studio
Minneapolis, MN

sheaglass.com

2019 booth #

My work consists of blown glass characterized by vivid colors in facetted forms.

Each piece is worked on a blow pipe out of a furnace to create the color patterns and shapes. When cool I grind the glass to shape, sandblast and acid etch the frosted parts, and polish the facets to open up the interiors of each piece.

I have been working in glass since college in the seventies. I enjoy glass because you have to plan the work before you make it but you also have to see what you have before you and deal with that. Glasswork is very hands on and very thoughtful, both aspects that I appreciate.

© Andrew Shea

© Andrew Shea

bio.jpg

Jill Hunter

Hunter-Smith Handwovens

Minneapolis, MN

2019 booth #

jillhunterweaver.com

Handwoven, Hand-dyed scarves and shawls woven with silk and other fine natural fibers. I believe that what you wear can lift you spirits and improve your outlook, so I am proud to be able to create art that is both decorative and functional. After a dozen years of experimenting with color, fibers, and structure, I’ve narrowed my focus to weaving contemporary scarves and shawls, combining an age-old craft with current tools.

Using all natural yarns, silks, cotton, rayon, and wools, I dye using color fast environmentally friendly pigments before warping the looms. I have one eight-harness and two sixteen- harness looms that allow me to weave intricate structures and patterns that compliment my color schemes. These looms are all hand and foot powered, just as looms of the past. I use a computer to draft my unique complex designs to create contemporary scarves and shawls for today’s consumer.

 

 

 

© Jill Hunter

© Jill Hunter

© Jill Hunter

© Jill Hunter

Bruce Kaupanger

© Bruce Kaupanger

© Bruce Kaupanger

Spring Creek Clay,Etc
Rice Lake, WI
BruceKaupanger.com
2019 booth #92

I do Raku pottery and add horsehair to each piece- Underglazes are added to the pot before it is bisque fired-A clear glaze is used on the pot so the underglaze colors will come through- After the hot pot comes out of the glaze kiln horsehair is added creating a carbon trail design.  When my Raku pots dry I spray them with colored underglazes.  After bisque firing, I paint a clear glaze on the pot; this allows the  underglaze color to come through,  When the hot pot comes out of the glaze kiln I put it in a bucket of sawdust then apply horsehair.

Born and raised in Stoughton Wisconsin.  I graduated from UW-Eau Claire with a BA in 1969 and from UW-Superior with a MA in 1975.  Taught art in the Rice Lake Wisconsin School District for 33 years.   Retired in 2002 and have been making lots of pots ever since.  I am blessed with a wonderful understanding family.  Life is GOOD !!                                                                                                                                             

© Bruce Kaupanger

© Bruce Kaupanger

© Bruce Kaupanger

© Bruce Kaupanger

© Bruce Kaupanger

© Bruce Kaupanger